Events in Usdan

Jan 19

Jan 25

Jan 26

WSA: CoCo Drop In Hours

11:00 am

Hours for Student Groups to drop in to answer any questions, concerns, or comments pertaining to their student group

Jan 27

Feb 1

Feb 2

WSA: CoCo Drop In Hours

11:00 am

Hours for Student Groups to drop in to answer any questions, concerns, or comments pertaining to their student group

RA Info Session

11:50 am

Apply to be an RAfor the 2018-19academic year. All candidates are required to attend an information session to learn more about the position.

Feb 3

Feb 5

Center for Humanities: Monday Night Lecture Series

06:00 pm

Joan W. Scott, Institute for Advanced Studies Neither Grand nor Modest: Critique as a form of historical analysis This talk will argue that critical approaches to history need neither endorse grand narratives nor restrict themselves to small case studies. Using material from my new book, Sex and Secularism, I will try to formulate what I take to be a vision of theoretically informed critical history.

The Educational Consultant Experience at Elite Scholars of China

07:00 pm

Elite Scholars of China is looking for talented, motivated Wesleyan seniors to join our team! Please join Dorothy Ajayi '15 as she introduces professional opportunities at ESC. As the premier Beijing-based education consulting firm, ESC (co-founded by Wesleyan alumnus Tomer Rothschild '94) helps Chinas brightest students apply to top US colleges and universities. What sets ESC apart from other education consulting companies in China is that we believe in upholding ethical consulting practices, and we create a holistic learning environment to ensure that our students can thrive academically and socially on an American college campus. The Educational Consultant position is ideal for someone who wants to develop their professional skills with a fast-growing entrepreneurial company. Former ESC colleagues have continued on to pursue degrees at Yale Law School, Harvard Business School, UPenns Graduate School of Education, and Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. Attire: Business Casual

Feb 6

Apogee Adventures Information Session

07:00 pm

Apogee is looking for responsible, dynamic, and motivated applicants to lead experiential-education and adventure programs throughout the United States, Europe, and the Caribbean in the summer of 2018. Leaders must serve as excellent role models while fostering an atmosphere that is safe and welcoming to bring out the best in each student. Excellent decision-making, adaptability, risk management skills, and the ability to cooperate in a shared leadership position are necessary.

Feb 8

Feb 9

WSA: CoCo Drop In Hours

11:00 am

Hours for Student Groups to drop in to answer any questions, concerns, or comments pertaining to their student group

Feb 10

Feb 12

Center for Humanities: Monday Night Lecture Series

06:00 pm

Timothy Mitchell, Columbia University On Capitalization We have recently come to understand the economy not as a feature of all societies, nor as an aspect of the emergence of market societies since the eighteenth century, but as mode of organizing material worlds that developed only in the mid-twentieth century. The birth of the economy responded to an earlier development, the rise of the large corporation. The corporation provided a way of building technical-spatial arrangementsinitially colonies, canals, and railways, later oil fields, dams, urban fabrics, industrial processes, and consumer worldswhose scale, durability, and powers of control promised a future stream of income that could be "capitalized" in the present. Capitalization became a method for transferring future income to the present. If the era of the economy was a short-lived attempt to stabilize the increasingly speculative futures on which capitalization came to depend, today we inhabit a post-economy--the future that capitalization impoverished.

Feb 16

WSA: CoCo Drop In Hours

11:00 am

Hours for Student Groups to drop in to answer any questions, concerns, or comments pertaining to their student group

Feb 17

Feb 19

Center for Humanities: Monday Night Lecture Series

06:00 pm

Gabrielle Ponce-Hegenauer Chariotless: The Poet in the Anthropocene The author, we know, is long dead. The subject, sous rature , has both disintegrated into and been subsumed by a given affective whole. The nature of this giveness remains unaccounted for and (its various constituents) unaccountable. This lecture seeks to engage the difficult and understudied relationship between Hegels and Husserls subjectivity by overstepping the formers Phenomenology of Spirit , in order to explore Hegels later formulation of lyric subjectivity. Taking cues from both Hegel (that is the Hegel of the Aesthetics) and Husserl (that is the late Husserl informed by Eugen Fink), I retain the Posthuman formulation of a complex field of forces, but simultaneously recover Platos conception of an immortal subject as self-moving a Hegelian lyric subjectivity , or a Husserlian self-constuting subjectivity which may ride these corporeal and incorporeal fields of forces, may act ethically and relationally, by way of a pre-linguistic intuition of unthought forms, a self-governing and creative synthesis, rather than by way of an integration that is always already disintegration. These phenomenological traces of a linguistic reframing work through, over and against the enframing (the reduction of beings to entities of a system) in any number of symbolic orders. I call this the poet in the Anthropocene in order to articulate the differnce of an immortal subjectivity (unconditioned and unconditional) within a collectively constituted world.

Feb 20

Overland Information Session

07:00 pm

p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 10.0px Helvetica} p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 10.0px Helvetica; min-height: 12.0px} p.p3 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 8.0px Helvetica} p.p5 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 8.0px Arial} li.li4 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 10.0px Arial} span.s1 {text-decoration: underline ; font-kerning: none} span.s2 {font-kerning: none} span.s3 {font: 10.0px Helvetica; font-kerning: none} span.s4 {font: 10.0px Arial; font-kerning: none} span.s5 {font: 8.0px Arial; text-decoration: underline ; font-kerning: none; color: #042eee} span.s6 {text-decoration: underline ; font-kerning: none; color: #042eee} ul.ul1 {list-style-type: disc} Overland hires exceptional college students and recent college graduates to lead students in 4th-12th grade on hiking, biking, language, writing and service-learning programs. Leaders act as role models for students and create wholesome and supportive environments where every student can flourish. Our staff of over 200 leaders and support staff spend 10 days training and six weeks leading or supporting programs throughout the summer. Small groups, carefully crafted programs and inspiring leadership have been at the heart of what we do for the past 33 years. -52 itineraries, 20 countries, 5 continents: thats a lot of adventure. But leading for Overland is more about the people who surround youthe dynamic leaders you work with and the great kids you leadand the many challenges that you tackle together. -An Overland leaders commitments are many, but nothing is as important as your kids and your co-leader. No matter where you are, no matter what youre doing, your most important commitment is the health and well-being of your kids and your co-leader. -In the end, leading for Overland is far greater than the sum of its parts. Theres exciting adventure, great people, important commitments, endless challenges, an inclusive community and a vibrant network. Visit our website for more information on applying, and come to our info session to learn more about this leadership opportunity. Please email Emily Hammel emily@overlandsummers.com if you plan to attend. We would love to meet you! Apply by our next application deadline on Monday, January 8th to be considered for an on-campus interview.

Feb 23

WSA: CoCo Drop In Hours

11:00 am

Hours for Student Groups to drop in to answer any questions, concerns, or comments pertaining to their student group

Feb 24

Feb 26

Center for Humanities: Monday Night Lecture Series

06:00 pm

Julia Adney Thomas, University of Notre Dame The Historian's Task in the Anthropocene: Theory and Practice Climate denialism comes in many forms. Most historians understand that the planet faces severe environmental challenges, yet few incorporate this new reality into their work or consider its impact on our discipline. Julia Adeney Thomas explains why some scientists find "the Anthropocene" a compelling concept and the challenges it poses, particularly to history's political function. Finally, using an example from Japan, she proposes a new form of critical history as we move from modernitys promise of freedom and development to the more modest goal of sustainability with decency.

Mar 2

WSA: CoCo Drop In Hours

11:00 am

Hours for Student Groups to drop in to answer any questions, concerns, or comments pertaining to their student group

Mar 3

Mar 5

Center for Humanities: Monday Night Lecture Series

06:00 pm

Lynn Festa, Rutgers University Robert Hooke's Prosthetic Gods Tasked with the fabrication of instruments in his capacity as curator of experiments for the Royal Society, Robert Hooke was insatiable in his quest for prosthetically-acquired superpowers able to extend the body's capacities beyond its organic bounds. Focusing on Hooke's dazzling compendium of observations of the microscopic world, the 1665 Micrographia , this talk addresses the way the instrumental enhancement of the senses, by blurring the threshold between person and thing, transformed Hooke's understanding of the human. My interest lies in the way technology reconfigures what might be called Hooke's anthropology: his understanding of humanity as a historical object. How do Hooke's devices these prosthetic "helps" for the inadequate senses contribute to the broader history of what the philosopher Bernard Stiegler terms "the invention of the human": both the technical invention of the human and the human inventing the technical? In what ways do things (tools, prosthetics) tinker with the distinction of human from animal? In Hooke's account, the grand master narrative of human progress and technological prowess is inextricably bound up with the eye's dependence upon instruments that rescale its capacities to register the claims of the microscopic world.

Mar 8

Mar 29

Mar 30

WSA: CoCo Drop In Hours

11:00 am

Hours for Student Groups to drop in to answer any questions, concerns, or comments pertaining to their student group

Mar 31

Apr 2

Center for Humanities: Monday Night Lecture Series

06:00 pm

William Pinch, Wesleyan "Blown from Cannon: A History of Violence, 1857-1764 This paper examines the practice of blowing men from cannon, a peculiarly British mode of battlefield punishment for indiscipline, insubordination, and mutiny in the Bengal Army (1764-1858). As became gruesomely evident in 1857, blowing from the guns" served as a didactic spectacle of violence during the supression of the Sepoy Mutiny (a.k.a. Great Rebellion, a.k.a. First War of Indian Independence). As it turns out, there was considerable precedent for this. While the origins of the practice are obscure, what is not in doubt is the fact that it had become a oft-resorted to mode of battlefield punishment over the course of the previous seven decades, particularly for insubordinate troopsand particularly if those troops were Indian. While the paper begins and ends in 1857, the main focus is on the first recorded use of the punishment in the Company Army in the late eighteenth century, during the prelude to the Battle of Buxar in 1764 (a conflict that cemented Company power in north India). Of particular note are the multiple first-hand accounts of Buxar and the evolution of the "Buxar narrative" as it becomes inscribed in institutional history (and myth) during the course of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. The historiographical shadow of Buxar plays an outsize role, I suggest, in the informal embrace of "blowing from cannon" by Company authorities in the nineteenth century, even as the practice is being increasingly described in British sources as "an old Mughal punishment.

Apr 5

Africonnect 2018

11:50 am

This is an afternoon of panels in which African literature scholars from regional universities (Yale, UConn, and Brown) will meet to discuss works in progress. The events will culminate in an evening reading by Chuma Nwokolo from his new book The Extinction of Menai which is co-sponsored by the Creative Writing Program and opened to the wider Wesleyan community.

Apr 6

WSA: CoCo Drop In Hours

11:00 am

Hours for Student Groups to drop in to answer any questions, concerns, or comments pertaining to their student group

Apr 7

Apr 9

Center for Humanities: Monday Night Lecture Series

06:00 pm

Ying Jia Tan, Wesleyan Catastrophes and the Centralization of Urban Planning in Modern China Why and how did Chinas mega-cities expand so rapidly in the past one hundred years? The talk focuses on two examplesTianjin and Shanghai. In both cases, catastrophes created the impetus for the centralization of urban planning. During the early twentieth century, Chinese railway developers and foreign river conservancy bureaus in the northern port city of Tianjin participated in a land grab that led to Tianjins expansion. The failure of the railway and river conservancy projects to coordinate their projects led to a massive flood in Tianjin in 1917. This forced Chinese and foreigners to collaborate and avert future disasters. In the case of Shanghai, an air raid by the retreating Nationalist Air Force in February 1950, exposed the vulnerability of the city. The Communist regime was reluctant to expand Shanghais power-generating capacity to meet increasing demand for electricity. This led to the implementation of peak-load management. The Shanghai Power Bureau ran its existing generators to full capacity round the clock, while the power bureau chief micro-managed the production schedules of hundreds of factories across the city to evenly spread out production activity over the twenty-four clock. The intensity of the micro-management brings to mind Georg Simmels description of the mental life of the metropolis, in which punctuality, calculability, exactness are forced upon life by the complexity and extension of metropolitan existence. It is precisely this calculability and exactness that laid the groundwork for high-density urban development unique to modern China.

Apr 12

Apr 13

WSA: CoCo Drop In Hours

11:00 am

Hours for Student Groups to drop in to answer any questions, concerns, or comments pertaining to their student group

Apr 14

Apr 16

Center for Humanities: Monday Night Lecture Series

06:00 pm

Andrew Curran, Wesleyan Diderots Hairshirt: The Story of the Great Encyclopdie Diderots Encyclopdie is now seen as the supreme achievement of the Enlightenment era. Designed to pass on the temptation and method of intellectual freedom to a huge audience in Europe and, to a lesser extent, in faraway lands like Stockholm and Philadelphia, this seventeen-volume dictionary became the most controversial (and profitable) book of the eighteenth century. In addition to dragging sacrilege and freethinking out into the open, the Encyclopdie triggered a decades-long scandal that involved the Sorbonne, the Paris Parliament, the Jesuits, the Jansenists, the King, and the Pope. In this talk, Curran will examine how this book became a symbol of secularism, freethinking, and a testament to the power of eighteenth-century commerce.

Apr 19

Apr 20

WSA: CoCo Drop In Hours

11:00 am

Hours for Student Groups to drop in to answer any questions, concerns, or comments pertaining to their student group

Apr 21

Apr 23

Center for Humanities: Monday Night Lecture Series

06:00 pm

Stepanie Burt, Harvard University Twitter Stevens, Tumblr Stevens

Apr 26

Apr 27

WSA: CoCo Drop In Hours

11:00 am

Hours for Student Groups to drop in to answer any questions, concerns, or comments pertaining to their student group

Apr 28

Apr 30

Center for Humanities: Monday Night Lecture Series

06:00 pm

Ethan Kleinberg, Wesleyan Haunting History: Grand Digital Schemes in a Modest Analog Box In this talk I argue for a deconstructive approach to the practice and writing of history at a moment when available forms for writing and publishing history are undergoing radical transformation. To do so, it explores the persistence of ontological realism as the dominant mode of thought for conventional historians and the ways this mode is reinforced by current analog publishing practices. This despite the grand digital schemes of both historians and publishers. These digital schemes are restricted by what I call the analog ceiling which functions because it allows one to argue that even though the past may not really correlate to the narrative reconstructions of ontological realism, this form is nevertheless the best analogy to make the past intelligible, understandable, and comprehensible. The dominance of ontological realism in the historical profession is no longer justifiable based on our current understanding of the past or the modes available to digital scholarship but is nevertheless supported by our current scholarly publishing practices. To counter this model, I advocate for a hauntological approach to history that follows the work of Jacques Derrida and embraces a past that is at once present and absent, available and restricted, rather than a fixed and static snapshot of a moment in time. This polysemic understanding of the past as multiple and conflict is what makes the deconstructive approach to the past particularly well suited to new digital forms of historical writing and presentation.

May 3

May 4

WSA: CoCo Drop In Hours

11:00 am

Hours for Student Groups to drop in to answer any questions, concerns, or comments pertaining to their student group

May 5

May 12

May 19